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Child Welfare Training Grant

Child Welfare Training Grant Logo

In 2003, Forest Institute of Professional Psychology received a five-year, $1.2-million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families for the development of a curriculum to train child welfare professionals, Head Start Family Advocates and community members about the benefits healthy marriage and family formation to child well-being.

Read more: About The Child Welfare Training Grant

Child Welfare Training Grant

A “fragile family” has been defined as unmarried parents raising a child together. This module explains how the quality of life (physical health, educational outcomes, and emotional wellbeing) is affected in children from fragile families. Learn to understand the culture of fragile families and the challenges they face.

Read more: Fragile Families and Environmental Issues

Child Welfare Training Grant

In 2000, 4.4 million children lived in stepfamilies in the United States. Additionally, one third of Americans are currently a stepparent, stepchild, stepsibling or other member of a stepfamily. When remarriage joins two families, they face new challenges. This module investigates some of these challenges and offers suggestions on steps to take to become a successful stepfamily.

Read more: Stepfamily Dynamics and Supporting Programs

Child Welfare Training Grant

Even though research demonstrates that 90% of Americans disapprove of infidelity, approximately 20% of women and 30% of men have experienced extramarital sex. Learn what constitutes an affair, the common types of affairs, and how children are affected by affairs. Suggestions on protecting marriage from an affair and ways to rebuild after an affair are reviewed.

Read more: Handling the Challenge of Infidelity

Child Welfare Training Grant

This module illustrates the types of abuse, cultural aspects of domestic violence, types of domestic violence, and warning signs of abuse. A helpful handout for clients contemplating leaving an abusive home as well as a danger assessment is included. This module helps prepare those in the helping profession to provide clients with strategies to handle domestic violence.

Read more: Domestic Violence and Intimate Relationships

Child Welfare Training Grant

Statistics indicate that substance abuse is not a problem that only affects “other” people. Rather, substance abusers dramatically impact the lives of the people around them. Learn how children are affected when they live in a home with substance abuse, how couple dynamics relate to substance abuse, and how these families can be helped.

Read more: Substance Abuse and Intimate Relationships

Child Welfare Training Grant

In the United States, 4.5 million children are living in grandparent-headed households. Discover the special issues these families face and what may be of help for grandparents raising grandchildren. Helpful coping skills to share with these grandparents are included in this module, along with thoughts on supporting the grandparent couple relationship.

Read more: Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

Child Welfare Training Grant

Immigrant families face stressors unique to their population. When working with immigrant families it is important to ask about their specific culture and ethnicity, as a family’s ethnic background influences the interaction between family members. To better understand the changes faced by these families, this module discusses the five stages of racial/cultural identity development. Suggestions for working with immigrant families are included.

Read more: Marriage and Family Concerns for Immigrants

Child Welfare Training Grant

In 1996, the United States became the world’s leader in fatherless families. In 2000, 25% of America’s children lived in mother-only families. This module demonstrates how children can benefit from having an involved father-figure. Fatherhood programs and resources are emphasized to promote father involvement.

Read more: Promoting Father Involvement

Child Welfare Training Grant

Premarital and marital education can provide the tools needed to improve a relationship or marriage. Premarital/marital programs are not therapy, the programs are educational in nature, and are typically taught in a classroom-like setting or workshop format. Research shows that there is a variety of these education programs to teach couples how to work together to survive the ups and downs of a lifetime commitment. Topics such as communication, conflict resolution, and finding fun in marriage are discussed.

Read more: Premarital/Marital Education and Mentoring

Child Welfare Training Grant

Early romantic experiences are believed to play a central role in the development of the self and the ability to be intimate with significant others. The typical adolescent has unrealistic beliefs about dating and marriage, little knowledge about adult roles, and social skills that are just developing. Early relationship education is important because many adolescents do not have a model of a healthy relationship in their family or friendship networks. Examples of relationship programs for adolescents and singles are included.

Read more: Relationship Education for Singles

Child Welfare Training Grant

Learn characteristics of healthy families, benefits of marriage for adults, benefits of marriage for children, and how healthy marriages make for healthy communities. Learn what a community healthy marriage initiative is and how your community may benefit from this type of program. This module shows that marriages, healthy or unhealthy, are not just a private matter, they affect the whole community.

Read more: Healthy Marriage And Your Community

Child Welfare Training Grant